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Lesson 383

Mechanics - Punctuation - Semicolons

 

Use a semicolon before a conjunctive adverb that introduces a clause in a compound sentence.

 

Common conjunctive adverbs are therefore, nevertheless, moreover, consequently, furthermore, besides, then, thus, instead, accordingly, otherwise, so, yet, still, hence, however. Example: Jill knew she could not win; nevertheless, she kept running.

 

Explanatory expressions (for example, namely, on the contrary, in fact, that is, on the other hand) are used similarly as conjunctive adverbs with a semicolon preceding them and a comma following. Example: The weather was wonderful; in fact, it was the best weather for a month.

 

Instructions: Place semicolons where they are needed in the following sentences.

 

1. I have not heard the latest comments therefore, I cannot render an opinion.

 

2. Our children have traveled throughout the world for example, Australia, Brazil, Korea, and Russia.

 

3. In Brazil we have seen many places on the other hand, we have never been to Africa.

 

4. We plan to return some day to Brazil therefore, we want to visit Rio, Sao Paulo, and Manaus.

 

5. Barbara is a diligent student she, in fact, is tops in her class.

 

 

--For answers scroll down.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Answers:

 

1. I have not heard the latest comments; therefore, I cannot render an opinion.

 

2. Our children have traveled throughout the world; for example, Australia, Brazil, Korea, and Russia.

 

3. In Brazil we have seen many places; on the other hand, we have never been to Africa.

 

4. We plan to return some day to Brazil; therefore, we want to visit Rio, Sao Paulo, and Manaus.

 

5. Barbara is a diligent student; she, in fact, is tops in her class.

 


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DAILY GRAMMAR - - - - by Mr. Johanson

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