Daily Grammar

Lesson 364

Mechanics - Punctuation - Commas

Use commas to set off nonrestrictive clausesA clause is a group of words having a subject and a verb.  Source: Lesson 246 and phrasesA phrase is a group of words used as a sentence part. It does not have a subject and a verb. It can be a noun, adjective, or adverb. Some common phrases are prepositional, gerund, participial, and infinitive.  Source: Lesson 246. Nonrestrictive clauses and phrases are modifiers that can be omitted without changing the meaning of the main clause.

Example:
Our new boat, which we bought last week, is a pleasure to use.
(The adjective clause "which we bought last week" is not needed to understand the meaning of the main clause.)

Instructions: Place commas where they are needed.

1. The Jazz which is a much different team from last year start the season next week.

The Jazz, which is a much different team from last year, start the season next week.

2. The waiter balancing two trays of food saw our signal for the check.

The waiter, balancing two trays of food, saw our signal for the check.

3. Ads which are essential to our economy are very annoying much of the time.

Ads, which are essential to our economy, are very annoying much of the time.

4. For this job we need a person who is very creative.

No comma needed. The clause "who is very creative" is needed for the meaning of the main sentence.

5. The new baby delivered in the taxi changed our lives completely.

The new baby, delivered in the taxi, changed our lives completely.

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